Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Omega 3 Fish Oils

After my recent physical situation with a rash and itching, Dr. Canali had me start taking Omega 3 Fish Oils. The brand I take are Arctic Oils. Part of the situation I was facing after we addressed the psychological, emotional and nervous system issues was that my skin was not moisturizing itself. After taking these, I could tell the difference in my skin as it was not as dried out as it had been. I believe the fish oils really helped me recover from the rash and itching that was going on in addition to the other nervous system issues that we addressed. It was a dual approach that made a big difference for me.


GOOD FOR THE HEART

Omega-3 fatty acids benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk of — or who have — cardiovascular disease. Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden death. Omega-3 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, slow growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, and lower blood pressure (slightly). American Heart Association

There is evidence from multiple studies supporting intake of recommended amounts of DHA and EPA in the form of dietary fish or fish oil supplements lowers triglycerides, reduces the risk of death, heart attack, dangerous abnormal heart rhythms, and strokes in people with known cardiovascular disease, slows the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques ("hardening of the arteries"), and lowers blood pressure slightly. - Mayo Clinic


JOINT PAIN, DEPRESSION, MIGRAINES, AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

Omega 3 Oils give almost immediate relief from joint pain, migraines, depression, autoimmune diseases and many other conditions. And, by improving brain development and memory functioning, from conception through old age, certain Omega-3 oils also provide the perfect brain food. Omega-3.Us


GOOD FOR THE SKIN

Q: I’ve heard that fish oil supplements with their omega-3 fatty acids are good for the skin. Is that true?

A: Absolutely. Fish oil contains two main types of omega-3 fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). DHA keeps the brain functioning properly. And EPA greatly benefits skin by regulating oil production to boost hydration and prevent acne, and by delaying the skin’s aging process to stave off wrinkles. A 2005 study in the Journal of Lipid Research discovered that EPA can help block the release of the UV-induced enzymes that eat away at our collagen, causing lines and sagging skin. Because EPA is both an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory agent, it can protect against sun damage and help repair it. LivingHealth.com


WHAT ARE OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS

Omega-3 fatty acids are a class of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids with the double bond in the third carbon position from the methyl terminal (hence the use of "3" in their description). Foods high in omega-3-fatty acids include salmon, halibut, sardines, albacore, trout, herring, walnut, flaxseed oil, and canola oil. Other foods that contain omega-3-fatty acids include shrimp, clams, light chunk tuna, catfish, cod, and spinach. MedicineNet


DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TYPES OF OMEGA 3'S

It's also important to know the differences between the types of omega-3s. EPA (eicosapentaenoic acids) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acids) are long-chain fatty acids with 20 and 22 carbon atoms respectively. ALAs (alpha-linoleic acids) are short-chain with 18 carbon atoms each. We find ALAs in flaxseed oil, and vegetarians often prefer it for their omega-3 needs. The only use of ALA is that it can be converted by our bodies into the other two kinds. However, the amount of it that gets converted is between 0.2% and 15% – hardly enough to make it worthwhile — and what doesn't get converted instead becomes inflammatory! For the best results, the EPAs and DHAs found in fish oil are the way to go. FishOilBlog.com


RISKS OF EPA AND DHA 3 FATTY ACIDS


In a letter published October 31, 2000,[58] the United States Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements noted that known or suspected risks of EPA and DHA n−3 fatty acids may include the possibility of:

--Increased bleeding if overused (normally over 3 grams per day) by a patient who is also taking aspirin or warfarin. However, this is disputed.

--Hemorrhagic stroke (only in case of very large doses).

--Reduced glycemic control among diabetics in the FDA 1991-1993 Scientific Review. Wikipedia.Org


LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Always consult appropriate medical practitioners and be informed before taking any supplements.

No comments:

Post a Comment

NOTICE:

LINKS IN COMMENTS WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED.

SEE COMMENT POLICY